Metal Detectors code of ethics

  • TREASURE HUNTERS CODE OF ETHICS

 

  • I WILL respect all private property and do no metal detecting without the owner’s permission.
  • I WILL fill all excavations so as not to pose a danger to people or livestock.
  • I WILL appreciate and protect our heritage of natural resources, wildlife, and private property.
  • I WILL build fires in designated or safe places only.
  • I WILL leave gates as I found them.
  • I WILL remove properly dispose of any trash that I find.
  • I WILL NOT litter.
  • I WILL NOT destroy property, buildings, or ghost town remains and deserted structures.
  • I WILL NOT tamper with signs, structures, or equipment.
  • I WILL use thoughtfulness, consideration and courtesy at all times.

 

  •  Preserve Our Heritage 

 

  • DON’T BE A RENEGADE DETECTORIST
  •  Metal detecting is not allowed on designated National historical sites, designated Archaeological sites or National parks. This ruling is in compliance with the Archaeological Resources and Protection Act (ARPA). Failure to comply with these rules and other rules of the managing agency could subject you to citation, fine and/or imprisonment. Listed below is the detectorist’s code of ethics. Read them and protect our hobby.
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  • “CODE OF ETHICS”
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  • Before searching public sites, always check laws, ordinances or regulations that govern your search.
  • Never trespass. Always get permission. (in writing if possible).
  • Never leave open holes.
  • Report the discovery of items of significant value to local historian or museum in accordance with the latest legislation.
  • If live ammunition or lethal objects are discovered, mark the site and inform authorities.
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  • If detecting a site that is adjacent to a designated historical site or National Park, take a few minutes and contact the local Ranger or Historical Preservation Office.
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  • Let them know you are in the area and where you are detecting. If you are not sure where site boundaries are, ask the Ranger or Historical Preservation Officer. These people are here to protect the site but also to assist you and keep you out to trouble. Let’s work together to preserve our heritage and our recreational hobby.
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     WHERE CAN I HUNT?
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  • Getting permission is sometimes the most time-consuming part of the hobby, but is necessary in order to protect yourself and your finds.
  •       WHERE CAN YOU USE YOUR METAL DETECTOR?
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  • NATIONAL FORESTS AND FEDERAL LANDS: METAL DETECTING IS NOT ALLOWED! Only by special permit acquired from the Federal Government. Each area has a district office. This includes national seashores. (WARNING: You must obtain such permit in writing but you may still be liable.)
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  • CORPS OF ENGINEER LAKES, SHORELINE AND LANDS: Permission has been granted only on pre-disturbed sites such as beaches and swimming areas.
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  • BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT: Some areas of these lands are open for use of metal detectors, some are not. Contact the district office before detecting.
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  • CITY OF COUNTY PARKS, PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND LANDS: Most are open to metal detecting unless notice is given by a sign, city ordinance, law enforcement, or a school employee. Check with school offices or local law enforcement before detecting.
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  • PRIVATE SCHOOLS, COLLEGES, AND ACADEMIES: You must acquire permission.

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